Behaviour Management

Behaviour Management Problems

behaviour management issues These are behaviour management issues submitted by you. The situations are real. The names have been changed to protect the privacy of the people (both teachers and students) concerned.

 

 

 

The Behaviour Management Issues

 

 

Behaviour Management Scenario - Answering Back

Submitted by Brian;

I have a class and there are a couple of  kids who are always answering back. Sometimes they think their responses are funny and this starts other kids laughing. Once this happens I have terrible trouble getting the class back on track. I have tried growling at the kids and even sent some from the room but it doesn't seem to make any difference. What behaviour management strategies will help solve this problem?

Response.

Brian, there is not a teacher in the world who won't sympathize with this issue. Answering back is one of those teacher stressors that takes its toll on us all.  I hope this response helps.

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Behaviour Management Scenario - Sexual Misconduct

Submitted by Erin;

Back-chatting is the least of my worries! Behaviours I am most concerned about (and to this day have not had an experienced teacher be able to tell me how to deal with these behaviours) are as follows (Please note that I am a K-6 teacher and would like advice on how to deal with these behaviours with both the young and older students - most of the behaviours listed below I have observed with kids with no diagnosed condition - many in their first couple of years of schooling!):

Exposing private parts (particularly boys) and touching other students private parts, lifting girls' dresses (would like advice for both a male and female student as the culprit!).

Response.

Hi Erin, 

Thanks for your submission. There is definitely a process for handling this type of behaviour and while it may differ from state to state, the key responses are the same.  

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Behaviour Management Scenario - Harassment By Clique

Submitted by Erin;

I have a problem with students creating cliques e.g. getting the whole class to ignore/pick on one student, or organising cliques among students (girl settings and boy settings) in both the classroom and playground.

Response.

Hi Erin,

This is a classic issue and sits in the bullying/harassment area. 

I found this to be worse for girls and typically it has to do with the socialization process. This is a power play issue for kids. Kids use this strategy to improve or retain their position in the social order at the expense of others. Girls use this as an emotional tool to gain social status. Boys are more likely to use aggression and physical contact to gain their social standing.

Knowing these facts is crucial for successful behaviour management of this issue.

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Behaviour Management Scenario - Lying

Submitted by Ho Chi;

Lying is rampant in the classes I have. Do you have a way of dealing with kids who tell lies.

Response.

Hi Ho Chi,

This is one the those childhood issues that can be found in all year levels and in all social situations. 

There problem is finding the cause and of course there are several situations.

You have to deal with the student who

  • Truly Believes the Lie
  • Lies to Improve Self-Concept
  • Lies to Avoid Punishment or Gain a Reward
  • Lies for Fun
  • Lies to Hurt Others or Get Even
  • Lies to be Accepted in a Group

I hope this response helps

Bob

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Behaviour Management Scenario - Classroom Violence

Submitted by Erin;

Another problem I have had is students attacking other students physically. It is often unprovoked (other than being annoyed at their peers counting, humming out loud etc.) This includes, hitting, punching, kicking, pulling hair, pinching.

Response.

Hi Erin,

This is a pointy end issue. This must be reported immediately to admin.

I am pretty certain this behaviour will show up in the school's behaviour management policy and will have clear processes to follow.

An admin member will have to deal with this as it is usually involves a suspension or a detention at least.

Bob

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Behaviour Management Scenario - Leaving the Classroom

Submitted by Erin;

Sometimes students leave the classroom whenever they feel like it (this one has proven to be difficult as teachers are not allowed to physically restrain students from leaving the room, nor are we allowed to leave the classroom unsupervised, often resulting in having to disrupt the classroom next door to go and follow the student - and then the difficult task trying to bring the student back to the classroom!)

Response.

Coming Soon,

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Behaviour Management Scenario - Swearing

Submitted by Erin and Jason;

Swearing in the classroom has been a difficult behaviour management issue to manage.

Response.

Coming Soon,

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Behaviour Management Scenario -  Pulling out chairs

Submitted by Erin;

Kids often pull out chairs. Then when the student tries to sit down, they fall on their backside.

Response.

Coming Soon,

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Behaviour Management Scenario -  Your problem  here

Submitted by You;

List a behaviour management issue you have encountered.

Response.

Get an expert solution right here.

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Behaviour Management Scenario -  Exiting Kids

Hi Bob,

I have enjoyed your two installments, I jumped at the chance to take part as being in my first year of teaching I love learning about new behavioral management skills I can add to my toolbox.

In the second part you talk about removing the audience, I have heard of this before and have thought of doing so but don’t feel I can trust the student to be in the classroom on their own . Or sending them out of the room on their own for that matter.

Can you suggest how I can handle these situations? Specifically when there is more than one student that is being the ‘Bob’… I’ve learnt that spending the one-on-one time with the student does help keep them settled but this is not always and option and if it is it normally results in the other ‘Bob’ acting out. I have tried the peer tutoring but find they are easily off task shortly after.

Hope that makes sense 🙂
Thanks,

Danielle

 

Response.

Hi Danielle,

Thanks a great question. Exiting a kid from your classroom requires a strategic approach and careful consideration.

behaviour management in focus

Let Us Help You

  • Do you have a behaviour management issue in your classroom?
  • Do you have a situation for which you would like an expert opinion?
  • Do you have a problem where there seems no answers?

Then this is the place for you.

Submit a description of your problem as detailed as possible. Don't use real names and, while we need your email address to send you the answer, your identity will remain anonymous.

Our expert panel is made up of principals, deputy principals, classroom teachers (both primary and secondary), relief teachers, Heads of Department, Heads of Curriculum - every one of these people deal with behaviours every day.

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