A Positive Student Teacher Rapport in 5 steps.

positive student teacher relationshipIf you are unable to build a positive student teacher relationship, your teaching day is going to be tough. A positive teacher student relationship is the key to your success. Learn how to build a positive student teacher relationship with your students

student rapport

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(10) comments

Jeremy

I relief teach at many schools, so one big issue for me is remembering students’ names. Generally it’s only the difficult or brilliant or particularly outgoing students’ whose names I remember, unless I’ve taught the class multiple times. When I do remember a student’s name, I will use it and ask them how they are, how their weekend was or perhaps bring up something I remember about them to let them know that I care.
I make an effort to say something positive to each student in my class at least once per day – and sometimes it really is an effort and I don’t always achieve it, but I think it helps to keep the teacher-student relationship positive.
I also try to be mindful of students’ feelings and avoid situations that might cause humiliation – for instance, I never randomly choose students to read out-loud without knowing their level of confidence and competence.

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    You have hit the nail on the head Jeremy. Knowing your kids is powerful especially if they understand you know their learning needs as well. Just an idea but when talking to kids, talk about a curriculum strenght they have or are developing. That builds a trust that you have their learning needs at heart. I find that a powerful factor in determining positive student-teacher relationships.

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Colette

I find giving students some insight into my life, for example sharing news about my weekend and interests, is a great way to strengthen relationships.

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    Great idea Colette. It is a lot easier for a female. If I did that, the kids might find it a bit creepy! Sad state of affairs but true.

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James

In a new school I always give the students a chance to ask 5 questions about me. Coming from Ireland most students are intrigued by my accent and that helps to start a conversation.

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    Great idea James. I bet the both the students and staff would enjoy listening to your accent. Perhaps that’s a great idea for all relief teachers. Talk with an accent. Haha

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Denis

I also find that at new schools being a relief teacher it is difficult to remember student names. I do try and remember and take an interest in extra-curricular activities that the students are involved in.

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Meg

I always stand at the door in the morning and say hi to each child as they walk in the door. I try and ensure I interact with each student during the day to build up rapport and as I call the roll I look to see who says “here” and attempt to remember as many names as I can. When in the playground I try and have conversations with students just so they see I’m approachable and friendly.

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    Brilliant strategies Meg. You can’t fail with this approach.

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Des

I always think its great to make kids laugh so I try and create situations where light hearted things can be included in the day – in a controlled/relevant way!

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