Relief Teacher Pay in Australia

Relief Teacher Pay in Australia

Relief Teacher Pay in Australia differs from state to state. Casual and relief teachers across Australia are paid according to different enterprise bargaining agreements which change at different times. Read the details for each state and where possible follow links for more information. Take note of the date the information is updated as each state differs.

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(33) comments

This very interesting. Especially the high and low rate of each state. An experienced teacher in Tas certainly does well for themselves!

Reply
Bob

It is astounding, and disappointing, how each state deals with Casual and Relief Teaching so differently.

Bring on the National Schooling Agenda.

Reply
JW

Hi Bob,

I hope you don’t mind answering a question.
I am a three year trained teacher with over ten years teaching experience. I have had a significant break from teaching and now have a Return to Teaching condition on my registration. What rate of pay should should I expect in Queensland schools? Do rates vary in private and state schools?
I have looked at the Band 3 Step 1 classification ($329.94 per day) but assume that applies to four year trained teachers.

Your website is great!

Cheers

Jaye

Reply
    Bob

    Hi Jaye,

    Thanks for your question and comments.

    Easy answers first – private and state teachers are paid at different rates.

    Relief Teachers in Queensland are paid at a standard rate irrespective of experience – ie Band 3 Step 1. There is no salary progression for relief teachers.

    After 10 years experience I would think you would start at Band 3 Step 1. My understanding is there is now a common scale for all teachers but teachers without a degree stay on each step for an extra year. A 3 year trained teacher is still eligible for senior teacher status.

    Honestly, the best people to advise you about your entitlements would be the Qld Teachers Union.

    Even as principal I used them to confirm the pay status of staff. They were always correct.

    I hope this answers your question.

    Regards

    Bob

    Reply
Chloe

Hi,

I’m new to WA from the UK but have ten years qualified teachers experience, what daily rate do you think I would be on?

Thanks in advance

Reply
    Bob

    Hi Chloe,
    WA has a sliding pay scale for relief teaching. The highest rate is for teachers with degrees and at least 10 years teaching experience. Assuming WA count all your past teaching and you have a recognised degree you should be somewhere close to the top. Qld, on the other hand, have one rate for all relief teaching regardless of experience.

    Good luck with our job hunting.

    Bob

    Reply
Lisa

Hi Bob,

I am hoping you might be able to help me with an answer or where to find an answer. I am a 4 yr trained teacher (Qld) and I am starting to do some relief teaching in WA. I began my 5th year of teaching in 2011 and finished at my school in May of that year after taking special leave.

I am trying to find out what my relief teaching pay will be here in WA given my experience and training.

Thanks in advance
Lisa

Reply

    Hi Lisa,

    Western Australia has a wonderful clause which says “Previous qualifications may be taken into account when determining your starting salary. The Department takes each application on a case-by-case basis.”

    An awful rider but this is my understanding of the WA system. If you had started in WA, you would have started at the Graduate Scale level 2.1 ($60,545) because you are four year trained. You would have progressed to level 2.2 ($66,431) after your first year and then move to the teacher scale after your probation period.

    After 5 years service you should be on either 2.4 ($75.553) or 2.5 ($78,515) depending on the pro-rata service they count for your 2011 school year.

    My understanding of the supply teaching situation in WA (and I hope I am correct here) is that you start relief teaching at the rate based on your service and progress to the next step on a pro-rata basis.

    So I assume you should start at a hourly rate of $75.55.

    Queensland has one relief teaching rate of $65.98 irrespective of your years of experience but WA has not gone down that path and has a sliding scale.

    I hope this of some help.

    Reply
      Lisa

      Awesome, thanks for the info, I will try and get confirmation from the school that I have booked relief teaching at.
      I knew that WA paid teachers more than Qld in general, but did not realise that the relief teaching rate was based on a sliding scale, where Qld is one rate across the board. I think Qld needs to make some changes.

      Thanks again!

      Reply
Jenna Corlett

Hi there,

I am moving to WA in 3 weeks to start relief teaching. I have registered with a couple of teaching agencies but this is as far as I have got. I’m wanting to know whether there is a demand and whether I am able to get consistent preferably 5 days per week of relief teaching. Are you able to give me any advice on this?

Thanks!

Reply

    Hi Jenna,

    I have several WA members who might be able to help you. My understanding is that it takes time to get established as a relief teacher in the cities but a little easier in the outer suburbs and country. As for 5 days per week, you might be looking at contract work for this leave of work. Relief teaching for absences is less reliable. I have several articles on this site that may be worth reading and of course if you sign up you can get a free “50 Ways to Be a Better Relief Teacher” ebook. All for free for ever!

    Good luck
    Bob

    Reply
Jackie

Interesting to see the pay rates are all higher than what we earn in NZ (top rate $250-odd) Moving to Tasmania is strangely attractive…

Reply

    That IS interesting Jackie. I can’t believe there is not more consistency around Australia. It might come one day.

    Reply
Danielle Stewart

Bob, I hope you can help me with this query. I have been teaching for 10 years (7 years in the catholic system in WA and 3 in the state system in QLD). I resigned from the Qld state system and I have recently started relief teaching for an agency in WA. Will my years in the private system count as experience and does the fact that I resigned from the state system in QLD impact on my relief pay? I am a 4 year trained teacher? Really just wanting an idea of what my daily pay rate will be. Thank you

Reply

    Hi Danielle,
    I hate to be vague about this but there does not appear to be any consistency between any states about crediting of prior service. The general rule is that you are credited with the time served in any state irrespective of whether you leave or retire, or serve in state or private systems. Saying that each state has a rider on this clause which says something like “each case is determined on its merits.” Based on my understanding you should be paid the same as a teacher who has served 10 years. However, each state has its own relief teaching scale. For example in Qld it is a set rate irrespective whether you are a first year teacher or like me, teaching for 40 years.

    I hope I have not confused the situation for you but my relief teaching pay scale on the website is correct at the time of printing.

    Each state is different and each state will deal with each situation differently. I have also heard that the same situation has been treated differently in the same state. So it appears each department has confused itself.

    Good luck.

    Bob

    Reply
Kelly

Hi Bob,

Wondered if I could trouble you for a minute. I recently moved to WA and began relief teaching in a metro public school. I have 11 years teaching experience (although none of it is in Australia) and was very disappointed to find they’d put me on a very low rate of $229 a day. I also got $45 loading allowance, but this (and more!) disappeared once I got taxed. Is this normal? Should I challenge it?

I’m also worried that now I’m on the Government system at that low rate and my e-number is connected so I will always be paid at that rate in Government schools?

I have secured full time work for Term 4 in a private Catholic school now and they put me straight onto Step 10 pay with no questions asked! I’m confused and also worried about what might happen if I need to return to a Government school at any time.

Reply

    Hi Kelly,
    My understanding of your situation is that you should be on Step 10 if you are 4 year trained. I have updated the Western Australian pay situation above the reflect the current position.

    My guess is that the government schools are paying you at the entry level prior to assessing your specific situation. You should be paid in accordance with your experience.

    I hope you find this helpful. Let me know if you need more info.

    Bob

    Reply
katrina

Hi Bob,
I have been a ‘stay at home mum’ for the last 15 years.
I am considering returning to teaching and was wondering where to start and what
my salary options are likely to be. I am in Western Australia.
I am three year trained and taught for 8 years before I had my first child.
I then taught part time, in between children for one year.

I would really appreciate any advice you can offer on re registering and salary,
Many thanks

Reply

    Katrina,
    i hate to be the bearer of bad news.

    Before you can teach in a WA public school you must successfully complete the equivalent of a minimum of four years full-time university study which includes at least one year of full-time teacher education.

    Unless you maintained your teacher registration, you might need to do more training.

    I suggest you might need a formal ruling from WA department.

    Good luck

    Reply
WA new grad

I am a recent Graduate in WA.

I can confirm I received $229 per day plus $45 loading.

Seems a little low 🙁

Reply

    Thanks for your comments. I assume that is net and after tax.

    Reply
Claire

Hi

Thanks so much for all the great information here. I have a quick question I am hoping you might be able to help with me with. I thinking of going to NSW relief teaching. I am a 3 year trained teacher. I have 6 years experience teaching overseas and have been teaching as a CRT for 7 months in Victora. Would I start teaching at point 1 of the scale or does my overseas experience count?

Reply

Hi Claire,
I think you would start at point 1 of the scale. Your best best would be to check on the NSW Institute of Teacher Site.

1. Set up an online account with the Institute. You can do this here: http://etams.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/web/login/NewUser.aspx

2. Once you have created an account go to http://www.nswteachers.nsw.edu.au/my-account/ and log in.

3. Choose the “Teacher” tab at the top of your home page. Click on “Eligibility Assessment”.

I hope this is helpful.

Bob

Reply
New WA Relief Teacher

I’m a recent WA graduate and I have been paid $238 per day plus $47.75 loading BEFORE tax. Is this correct? I am unable to find any details regarding rates bar this site 🙂 I also worked the whole of last week but only seem to be paid for Thurs and Fri. Mon, tue and wed I worked at a different school. Is this common? Thanks

Reply

    Hi there,
    The rate of pay seems to fit the scale for beginning teachers in WA. The loading will depend on your location.

    It is quite common for days worked to go across a pay period. This is often just a paper work issue as schools have to submit their TRS forms usually on a Friday. I always maintain a diary just to keep a record of the days worked.

    The person to contact if you have any queries is usually the registrar who is responsible for the paperwork of the school.

    Good luck.
    Bob

    Reply
Claude

Hi there

I am a casual relief teacher with max. teaching experience teaching in a NSW Independent school.

Am I required to do an after-school 35 min. Bus Duty if I have not been listed for playground duties during the day?

If it is the normal after-school duty of the teacher that I am replacing that day, am I still required to do that after-school Bus duty?

Thank you

Reply

    Hi Claude,

    I am pretty certain that relief teachers are specifically excluded from doing bus duty after school. It’s a tough ask because bus duty is specifically the responsibility of full time teachers. Bus duty is actually mentioned in the Education regulations for teachers although unions have a different take on this issue.

    I reckon the school is taking advantage of your situation. How you tackle that is a critical issue if you want to be asked back.

    Let me know if you need some advice on THIS issue.

    Good luck

    Bob

    Reply
Jade Perry

Hi there,
I am looking to move to Perth with my partner – date is unknown yet, as visas are still being processed. I qualified in the UK as a Primary school teacher doing a 4 year course, which included a range of placements. I have 3 years experience teaching in a Primary school, and once over in Perth, I am interested in doing some supply work to start with before I commit to anything. Just wondered if you could give me a bit more advise on pay, having my qualifications checked and finding supply work. Over here in the UK, we have both supply agencies who set you up with work, or you can go out and hand your CV to schools and wait to hear from them directly.

Thanks

Reply

    Hi Jade. Can I point you to this part of my web page Relief Teaching Around Australia?. It has all the details about getting work in WA and all the other Australian states. Check out the pay rates and join up (It’s completely FREE) so you can keep updated on the details. Good luck.
    Bob

    Reply
Melanie

Hi, I do relief teaching at a private Anglican school in WA. Until this year the relief teaching pay was a set amount. Suddenly, this year, it changed so that as in government schools , the pay now depends on your years of experience. I find myself now no longer being called to the school as I am now too experienced. Surely this is unfair. What do you know about this and is there anything that can be done? Only graduates are being employed as they cost less.

Reply

    Hi Melanie, from your position it is totally unfair. Young graduates might disagree, however, because they have probably missed out for years because they don’t have experience and they can’t get experience when schools continually employ experienced staff. It is the age-old dilemma from which there will always be losers and winners, I’m afraid.

    Reply
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